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Importance of Plant Analysis

Plant analysis is an important nutrient management tool. Monitoring of plant nutrient levels at critical crop growth stages through the growing season can help identify potential and existing nutritional problems that can affect crop quality and yield.

In addition to our standard tissue program, we are pleased to offer a special Plant Monitoring Program (PMP)

Five Ways Knowing Plant Monitoring Pays

The following is a summary of the PMP.
  • - Evaluate your anticipated cropping plans prior to the growing season and select the fields to be monitored with the PMP.
  • - Enroll fields in the PMP by completing and submitting a PMP Enrollment Form.
  • - A unique Plant Monitoring ID (PMID) is assigned for each field.
  • - Plant samples are submitted with a PMP Submit Form.
  • - Sample analyses are reported on our special PMP Report Form.
  • Use Plant Analysis to Monitor Crop Requirements in Season.

    Yield Improvement Process

    Analyzing a plant tissue sample provides an evaluation of a crop's nutrient status at the time the sample is taken. Soil physical and fertility status, as well as weather conditions the crop has experienced up to the time of sampling, may have influenced plant nutrient levels. A plant's nutrient demand changes quickly in season as it goes from one stage of growth to another. Plant tissue analysis is a tool for diagnosing nutrient deficiencies. Unfortunately, crop yield can already be affected by the time visual symptoms of nutrient deficiencies are present.
    1. soil analysis, 2. water analysis, 3. plant tissue, 4. disease diagnostics, 5. pesticide residue analysis
    Plant tissue analysis is a tool for diagnosing nutrient deficiencies. Unfortunately, crop yield can already be affected by the time visual symptoms of nutrient deficiencies are present.
    Analyzing a plant tissue sample provides an evaluation of a crop's nutrient status at the time the sample is taken. Soil physical and fertility status, as well as weather conditions the crop has experienced up to the time of sampling, may have influenced plant nutrient levels. A plant's nutrient demand changes quickly in the season as it goes from one stage of growth to another.
    A crop that has set up to produce huge yield potential may run out of nutrient supply simply because of the demand that it places on the soil and the soils ability to supply certain nutrients before it becomes yield limiting. In some years a soil may not have the potential to finish those huge crops.

    Plant Monitoring Program 1 2 3 ...

    When should I Sample?
    A plant analysis monitoring program involves taking samples at multiple times during the growing season and accurately identifying the stage of growth so that we can match it to our data base of ranges. Individual tests results are evaluated for deficiencies, but particularly for nutrient trends over time. One nutrient may initially be sufficient, then trend low due to availability or demand that the crop is putting on the soil reserves.
    How often should I sample?
    Monitoring nutrient concentrations on a regular basis throughout the growing season provides multiple opportunities to evaluate the plant's nutritional condition to predict nutrient deficiencies that rob our crops of yield and quality. It is also an excellent tool to monitor and fine-tune crop nutrient supply during the growing season. Start tissue testing programs early before problems occur. Before taking tissue, samples ensure that timing and location of samples correlates with interpretive data.
    What should I do after Sampling?
    If a nutrient need is identified, in order for a nutrient correction to be effective, it has to happen early in season before the nutrient reaches critical thresholds. Once an element reaches these critical thresholds it is difficult to get a response. When using a monitoring program your largest crop will run out of nutrients the quickest. A poor or low tissue test does not always mean a poor crop; it usually means there is a lot of demand on nutrient supply because the crop is using the nutrients. In other words, your best crop may have the poorest tissue test. Just make sure you identify this and respond with the correctives before it is too late.

    NOTE: There is no cost to enroll fields in the PMP; you only pay for each plant analysis.

    All plant analyses are reported the next business day after receipt. Providing your E-mail address will ensure prompt delivery of reports and data and thus minimizing delays in decision making.
    Our PMP is an important tool to enhance your plant analysis program. Contact us to enroll your fields or for more information on this new service.